All you need to know about Subaru Transmissions

Replacement Subaru Gearbox Choices

In today’s automotive gearbox industry there are many terms used to describe repair techniques and consumers are sometimes unsure about exactly what they are getting. Terms like “repaired”, “overhauled” or “reconditioned” or “remanufactured” can be misleading because they mean different things in different workshops and there is no governing body to set and maintain standards. Sometimes this means consumers are worse off than before, because they might have purchased something that either exceeded their needs, or failed to meet them. Consumers have differing needs, in terms of application and budget. They might need a repair for an older car that won’t exceed the value of the car, or they may want a high quality replacement gearbox for a late model vehicle that will give long life and high reliability.

  • Manual
  • Auto
  • CVT

Gearbox choices can be confusing. With the many different models Subaru have produced over the years, and the slightly different configurations for specific world regions, there are many things to consider when sourcing a replacement gearbox. It’s not uncommon for consumers to be supplied with an incompatible unit. After making sure that you have identified the right replacement box, there is the question of just how far you want to take the repairs, choices ranging from one or two replacement parts, to a fully remanufactured assembly. At All Drive Subaroo we have worked over many years to design clearly defined levels of gearbox repair or replacement for differing purposes and budgets. Our different gearbox builds cater for all consumers, from those who need to keep an older car going inexpensively, to motorsport enthusiasts who need a gearbox strong enough to withstand high stresses while delivering high reliability. You can choose from the budget rebuilt 5-speed assembled with selected used and new parts, to a fully re-manufactured gearbox as good, or better than the OEM original. We also offer different levels of motorsport gearboxes.

Different types and build levels

Subaru turbo 5 speed manual gearbox – push and pull type

Problems, solutions and a caution

The story of the push or pull type clutch gearboxes begins in 1991 and is still being written, with some models still running the 5-speed manual gearbox. The earlier turbo four-bolt pull-type clutch models (series 1, 91-98) had many problems. While these gearboxes worked well, with a positive, quick action and were enjoyable to operate, the power generated by the turbo engines, especially when driven by younger more enthusiastic drivers, was often too much for 2nd and 3rd gears and there were frequent failures. In 99 Subaru moved to an 8-bolt gearbox, (series 2, 99-01) which was better shifting, and incorporated several other improvements. There were however still some problems with 2nd and 3rd gear breakages. This led to widespread customer dissatisfaction, which prompted Subaru to redesign the 8-bolt gearbox with a larger and more robust gear set. There are many small variations in the pull-type gearbox from 1991-2005 that prevent fitting boxes between models.

In ‘06- Subaru made a major change with the introduction of the push-type clutch gearbox and some changes in gearbox internal configuration that resulted in smoother shifts and enhanced all-round operability. The gearbox was finally all it should have been from the start in terms of useability and durability. However, the push-type clutch, with its extended thrust snout, brought with it new and different problems.

Turbo 5-speed gearboxes begin with the range: TY752, TY754, TY755, TY757 and TY758. Subsequent numbers identify which specific components are in the box. Any error in identifying the correct box for your car will usually come from a failure to identify the specific gearbox number that matches your Subaru’s VIN. All the specialist techs at All Drive Subaroo are up to date on all gearbox variants and understand the numbering system fully. You can be sure that an ADS supplied gearbox will be fully compatible with your Subaru.

Why not to buy second hand

There are many reasons why a second-hand gearbox is not the wisest choice. As noted, there are many compatibility issues, to do with gear ratios, and many minor variations Subaru has incorporated between models. Wrecking yards are not always able to correctly identify the compatible box for you and you could lose a lot of time and money. There is also the issue, particularly in the earlier models, of simply buying the same problems. There is no guarantee that your used box won’t soon fail in the same way as the old box did.

TAGS - Transmission Numbers

TY752VN5BA, TY752VN6AA, TY754VBAAA, TY755VB1AA, TY754VN1AA, TY754VN2AA, TY755VB2AA, TY754VBBAA, TY754VBBBA, TY754VB4AA, TY754VB5AA, TY755VH4AA, TY757VBBAB, TY754VB6AA, TY755VW5AA, TY754VB7AA, TY755VB7AA, TY758VE1AA, TY758VGZAA, TY758VWABA, TY756U1ZAB, TY756W1ZAB, TY751VIZDA

Subaru 5 speed Non turbo single and dual range gearbox

Dual range boxes have been made since the 80s with the Brumby, a popular vehicle for people living on the land. From 91 (EJ series) to 98 Subaru offered the series one dual range box as an option in all non-turbo models with ratios of 1.447 and 1.196. The boxes proved to be very versatile, suitable for inner city shopping excursions, highway cruising, or off-road navigation of rugged terrain. We are also developing a 1.6 ultra-low range “crawler” dual range box for the off-road enthusiast. The dual-range gearbox has proven to be reliable and durable.

Although Subaru never fitted the dual range box to their turbo models, ADS have developed a conversion kit for all turbo models and other single-range models. We have also developed a conversion kit specifically for the US market, where off-roading is a popular activity.

All dual-range transmission numbers begin with the range; TY752, TY753, TY74, TY755, TY756, TY757, and TY758. Subsequent numbers identify which specific components are in the box. All the specialist techs at All Drive Subaroo are up to date on all gearbox variants and understand the numbering system fully. You can be sure that an ADS supplied gearbox will be fully compatible with your Subaru.

Why not to buy second hand

Difference in ratios are even more critical in the dual range box with more possible incompatibilities. The dual range box also has some inherent weaknesses with bearings, which add to the risk of buying second hand. A rebuilt, reconditioned of remanufactured gearbox from All Drive Subaroo comes with peace of mind and a warranty. All Drive Subaru have all gearbox models and variations in stock.

TAGS - Transmission Numbers

TY752XHAAA, TY752X1DCA, TY753XR1AA, TY752V4DAA, TY752XR6AB, TY752VRCAB, TY754XKAAA, TY755XS1AA, TY754XR1AB, TY754XFADA, TY754XRAAA, TY754VR1AB, TY754VCAAB, TY754VRAAA, TY754VSBAA, TY754XRBAA, TY754XKBAA, TY755XS2AA, TY754XFBDA, TY754XFCAB, TY754XFCBB, TY754VF3BB, TY754XRBAB, TY754VFCAB, TY752XFCBB, TY754VF4BB, TY754XR4AA, TY755XF3AB, TY757XFAEB, TY757VRAAB, TY754VF5BB, TY757XFADB, TY755XF4BA, TY757VFABB, TY754VS5AA, TY755XF5BA, TY754VF6AB, TY754XR6AA, TY757XFBDB, TY754VR7AA, TY754VT7AA, TY757VFCCB, TY757XFCCB, TY754XR7AA, TY754XT7AA, TY755XF7BA, TY757XFCBB, TY757XFDBB, TY757XFDCB, TY757VDDAB, TY758VT1AA, TY758XFADA, TY758XFACA, TY758VFAAA, TY758XFZBA, TY756WCAAA, TY756WCABA, TY756WT5AB, TY751SDZDA, TY756WT5BB

Subaru 6 speed STI and Liberty gearbox

The Ultimate OEM Subaru Gearbox

The six speed box is by far the best and strongest gearbox Subaru have ever made, and with the highest level of operability. The six-speed gear set is nearly twice the size of the earlier five speed and twice as strong.

The six speed box (non-DCCD) was introduced in 2002 in the WRX STI, and revived interest in the Subaru brand. The STI still uses the six-speed box, but since 2003, the DCCD version. Subaru are aware that in some ways this gearbox is the centrepiece of their premium performance models, and have invested considerable time and money into ongoing research and development. The six-speed DCCD gearbox has gone from strength to strength and has no known issues. These gearboxes tend to run smoothly until they simply wear out. Most of the problems we see have to so with worn sliders and synchros, and general wear caused by hard use.

All these transmission numbers start with TY856. Subsequent numbers identify which specific components are in the box. All the specialist techs at All Drive Subaroo are up to date on all gearbox variants and understand the numbering system fully. You can be sure that an ADS supplied gearbox will be fully compatible with your Subaru.

Why not to buy second hand

While in some ways the six-speed makes a better buy second hand than earlier 5-speed boxes, (if you can find a low mileage example) any second hand box carries with it some risk to the buyer, in this case primarily to do with the level of wear and the kind of usage the box might have had. Many second hand boxes come in from overseas, and this raises additional compatibility issues. A rebuilt, reconditioned of remanufactured gearbox from All Drive Subaroo comes with peace of mind and a warranty. All Drive Subaru have all gearbox models and variations in stock.

TAGS - Transmission Numbers

TY856WB1CA, TY856WX3CA, TY856WX4CA, TY856WVBAA, TY856WVCAA, TY856WB6KA, TY856WG7KA, TY856WWDAA, TY856WWDAD, TY856WG8KA, TY856WPDAD, TY856WG8KD, TY856WPEBB, TY856UG1KA, TY856WWEAA, TY856UGIKA

Subaru 6 speed cable shift gearbox

New 6-speed boxes for WRX and Diesel Models

Following the success of the later 5-speed boxes, Subaru came out with the cable-shift split-case 6-speed gearbox with overdrive which is ideal for long-distance cruising. 4th 5th and 6th are all “overdrive” gears reducing cabin noise and increasing fuel efficiency. The new cable system provides a shorter gear throw and better feel. The wide range of gear ratios makes for a smooth transition from urban to highway driving. These gearboxes are found in WRX, and all manual diesel models from 2010 on. Although it is early days, these boxes have so far proven to be robust and reliable with a high level of customer satisfaction. We have however noted some issues with reverse gear. These boxes appear similar to the five speed box, and with the designation “6-speed” in the name, they are sometimes confused with the STI six-speed.

Because earlier model five-speeds with the 4:4 gearbox ratio tend to rev a little too high on the freeway, the newer six speed variant would make a useful upgrade. All Drive Subaru are currently developing a conversion process to adapt these newer boxes to earlier five speed models.

Box numbers start with TY756, with subsequent numbers identifying which components are in the box. All the specialist techs at All Drive Subaroo are up to date on all gearbox variants and understand the numbering system fully. You can be sure that an ADS supplied 6-speed cable shift gearbox will be fully compatible with your Subaru.

Why not to buy second hand

Essentially, buying a used replacement gearbox is a gamble. The first risk is incompatibility. If your gearbox has incorrect final drive ratios, catastrophic viscous coupling failure could be the result. Second hand gearboxes are not inspected internally and there may be existing defects which mean another expensive repair. A rebuilt, reconditioned of remanufactured gearbox from All Drive Subaroo comes with peace of mind and a warranty.

TAGS - Transmission Numbers

TY756WLAAA, TY756W1ZAB, TY756U1ZAB, TY756W1ABB, TY756WCABA, TY756WCAAA, TY756WT5AB, TY756WT5BB

Deceptive Appearances

Critical facts about compatibility among Subaru gearboxes

The automotive industry, and especially Subaru, engage in a great deal of parts sharing between models and this has created a situation in which many gearboxes look alike, but have small variations from model to model which mean they are not interchangeable. We have spoken about these minor variations in gearboxes and they are the cause of ongoing problems with sourcing compatible replacements. Your supplier might tell you that some of these differences are minor and don’t matter, but they do.

The major problem we have noted with gearboxes fitted with mis-matching numbers is incorrect ratios which can result in damage to front, center and rear diffs with a resultant repair bill higher than the original replacement gearbox. Incorrect final drive ratios will also affect driveability with the gearbox ratios not properly matched to the engine torque characteristics and rev range. Seemingly minor variations can have a major effect on the drivability and reliability of the car. They can affect the accuracy of the speedo, the operation of the clutch, the operation of neutral and reverse switches, and many others, some of which are noted below.

What is a centre differential or viscous coupling? So many different types

The essential character of the Subaru is in its unique symmetrical All Wheel Drive (AWD) system. With its flat boxer engine set back over the front wheels, Subaru have achieved a 50-50 weight distribution, the same balance as a Formula 1 race car. Combine that with power being distributed to all four wheels, and the ability to vary torque output from front to rear and back to compensate for wheel spin, and you have just about the most poised and satisfying production car on the road, below $100,000.

Literally at the center of the AWD system is a compact device that transfers power from the transmission to the front and rear differentials, the viscous coupling, fitted to all manual AWD Subarus. A viscous coupling in the simplest terms is a device for transferring torque from a spinning transmission shaft to the front and rear differentials of your Subaru. It serves also to vary the torque to front and rear wheels, depending on driving conditions. Basically the viscous coupling is a sealed steel cylinder containing a number of slotted disks immersed in highly viscous liquid silicon. Power is transferred from the input shaft via the silicon fluid and disks to the output shafts front and rear. When front or rear wheels spin under power, say, on a wet road, the corresponding output shaft will spin faster, generating more heat at its end, which causes the silicon to solidify and prevent torque from being transferred to the spinning wheels. By default, power is redirected proportionately to the other two drive wheels. The silicon is very sensitive to temperature and reliquefies almost instantly once the temperature drops. The system works so well that the driver is usually unaware of it.

Evolution of the Subaru Automatic Transmission

From 4AT to 5AT to CVT

The current design of Jatco automatic transmission being used in Subaru models, the 4EAT was introduced in 1988 in the Subaru XT6 and Leone Touring Wagon, in a four speed. The basic design has survived but with greatly revised internal set-up, plus the introduction in premium models of a 5-speed variant with sports shift, the 5EAT, based on the Jatco JR507E. Both variants have proven to be reliable and long-lasting with many vehicles passing through our workshop with 200,000 plus kilometres on the original transmission. Subaru owners have been very satisfied with the way these transmissions feel, and the general driveability, especially the sports paddle shift operation of the 5EAT. Like all automatic transmissions however there has been a small price to pay for the convenience and reliability of automatic transmission, and that price is diminished performance, and increased fuel consumption over the manual equivalents.

But now it appears that even those drawbacks have been eliminated with the introduction of the Lineartronic Constant Velocity Transmission (CVT). This transmission relies on a system of variable width pulleys and chains which takes power from a locked torque converter and feeds it constantly to the transfer case. As the load on the engine increases, the width of the pulleys increases, resulting in diminishing gear ratios. Changes in gearing are constantly variable and uninterrupted, meaning that power delivery is perfectly smooth, and the engine is kept constantly at optimum RPM. This system eliminates that familiar lurch, or forward surge during gear shifts and the “hunting” between gears under load than can occur with a conventional auto transmission. For drivers who enjoy changing gears there is the option of a “virtual” 6 or 7 speed manual where the driver can hold the car at specific ratios and change up or down with a steering wheel mounted paddle. This gearbox is more efficient than even the six speed STI manual gearbox, and slightly more economical on fuel. While it’s too soon to know for sure, the CVT box, with so few moving parts and no friction surfaces should be a very long-lived unit.

Box numbers start with TZ1A, TZ1B, TG5C, TG5D, TR580 and TR690 with subsequent numbers identifying which components are in the box. All the specialist techs at All Drive Subaroo are up to date on all gearbox variants and understand the numbering system fully. You can be sure that an ADS supplied gearbox will be fully compatible with your Subaru.

TAGS - Transmission Numbers

TZ102ZG2AA, TA102AH1AA, TA102AH2AA, TZ102ZGAAA, TA102AHAAA, TZ102Z3CBA, TZ102ZGCAA, TZ102Z3DAA, TZ103ZR1AA, TZ102Z3DBA, TZ102YB5BA, TZ102ZR5AA, TZ1A4ZFAAA, TZ1A3ZB2AA, TZ1A4ZFABA, TV1A4ZFAAA, TZ1A3ZS2AA, TZ1A2ZR7AA, TZ1A3ZS3AA, TZ1A4ZFCBA, TV1A4YVCAA, TZ1A4ZRCAA, TZ1A4ZFCAA, TZ1A3ZN3AA, TV1B4YVDAA, TZ1A3ZN3BA, TZ1A4ZFDBA, TZ1A4ZRDAA, TZ1A4ZR2AA, TZ1A4ZFDAA, TV1A4YMEAA, TZ1A4ZFEBA, TZ1A3ZF4AA, TZ1A4ZF3AA, TV1B4YN3AB, TZ1A4ZREAA, TZ1A4ZFEAA, TV1B4YNEAB, TZ1B7LHABA, TZ1B7LSAAA, TZ1A3ZF5AA, TZ1B7LFAAA, TV1B4YN5AB, TZ1B5LHYAA, TZ1A4ZF5AA, TZ1B7LFABA, Z1A4ZR5AA, TZ1A4ZF2AA, TZ1B5LWXAA, TZ1B7JLFAAA, TZ1A3ZF6AA, TZ1B7LF444, TZ1B5LGWAB, TZ1B5LFWAA, TZ1B7LTCAA, TZ1B7LFCBA, TZ187LFCAA, TZ1B7LFCAA, TZ1B4LT7AA, TV1B8MCEBA, TZ1B8LT1AA

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